Morrison Folktales about the name, tartan and badge.

Morrison Folktales about the name, tartan and badge.

Postby AlexanderWMorrison48 » Sun Mar 02, 2014 1:38 am

I am submitting the attached pdf paper to help serious Morrison family researchers overcome the temptation to believe all people bearing the name Morrison originate from a single source in Scotland, and that the tartan and badge are also part of the same mythology that surround to the origins of the "clan". To read the paper click on the attachment "The Morrison name, tartan and badge- a study of mythology.pdf".
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The Morrison name, tartan and badge- a study of mythology.pdf
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Re: Morrison Folktales about the name, tartan and badge.

Postby Alexander » Sun Mar 02, 2014 11:45 am

Alexander,

You have 'hit the nail on the head' in every way, making everything very clear. I am sure all members will appreciate your efforts in this respect; it was an exercise long overdue.

Alastair
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Re: Morrison Folktales about the name, tartan and badge.

Postby morrisondna » Mon Mar 03, 2014 8:36 am

N H Morrison suggests there were Gaels who were Moors who later became Norsemen or Saxons: “the fact that the Moors, and not the Morrises, have the same crest as the Morrisons, plainly points in that direction for the ancestry of the name. The name as originally written in Saxon, or in Saxon-English, would be Moores-son, or Mores-son; or if the h of the Gaelic were retained, Mhores-son, the Saxon genitive, our possessive, being es. This is by far the most regular, the most simple, the most natural, and, taking the crest into account, the most probable origin of the name. 'The Saxon language was "well established in England and the Lowlands of Scotland in the ninth century. In Norse, the name would be Moors-son, Mors-son, Mhors-son, the genitive being formed in s without the ‘e ‘."


Alexander,

Thanks for sharing so much of your research on Morrison history and mythology. You have touched on many points worthy of further discussion. One that I would like to comment on is the quote above. As a cousin of Nathaniel Holmes Morison (through the Holmes line), I have a copy of his journal from which this is quoted. My reading of this is that Morison was making the case that the name more likely to have derived from the NAME Moor (or Moore) rather than the name Morris (or Maurice) as evidenced by the similarity of the family crests or arms. Whatever the merits of his argument, Morison was not saying that the Morrisons were originally of Moorish ancestry, but only that there might be a connection between the Moore family name and the Morrison family name in the British Isles.

Edwin
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Re: Morrison Folktales about the name, tartan and badge.

Postby Gary Morrison » Tue Mar 04, 2014 4:52 pm

The long-standing confusion surrounding the origin(s) of the name Morrison is quite interesting. No doubt the change in language over the years has played a role in producing a singular name, and this combined with the absence of deep historic records.

One cannot help wonder whether some of those who carry the name form part of an original clan, small as it may have been, whereas others have different sources. Is our common name the result of anglicisation?

It seems to me that many of the arguments against there being a clan Morrison could be said of other clans as well, but I leave conclusions in this regard to those who have dedicated over the years more of their time, energies and intellectual pursuit to the question than I have. Perhaps DNA will, as the science develops, bring more clarity, to the origins of those who carry the name.

As for the tartan, I recall reading somewhere that the Morrison tartan has the most mysterious history surrounding it than any of the other clan tartans. Well, whether the tartan is truly historical or not, I personally enjoy it and am pleased to wear it, and I will continue to do so, at least until someone can unravel the story and provide a more reliable explanation that renders obsolete the current tartan.

All quite interesting indeed. I hope that someone is able to combine science and history to find more answers in the not too distant future.
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Re: Morrison Folktales about the name, tartan and badge.

Postby morrisondna » Tue Mar 04, 2014 11:59 pm

Gary,

Clearly there are many different Morrison family groups, with many different family origins. This was well accepted at the time that Ru's grandfather Dr. John Morrison was named "Chief of the Clan and Name of Morrison." I believe the term "and Name" was included specifically as acknowledgment that all Morrisons of Scotland did not share the same history. However, we all do fall under one Chief based on the action by Lord Lyon, so in that sense, we have all been officially included in Clan Morrison.

I agree with you that DNA research is helping us each learn the origins of our own Morrisons, wherever they may be from. It was never the intent of the Morrison DNA Project to prove that all Morrisons were of Hebridean lines, but to learn the individual history of each individual Morrison line. What has surprised us is just how many distinct Morrison lines there are. Some of the distinct genetic lines may well share the same history---for example, we have several groups who trace back to the Outer Hebrides. But my experience in family research has been that there are always fascinating stories to be uncovered if we are open to them, even if they are not always what we expected.

Edwin
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Re: Morrison Folktales about the name, tartan and badge.

Postby AlexanderWMorrison48 » Fri Jun 13, 2014 7:48 pm

Dear Readers,
Without wishing to buy into the arguments about the adoption of the name Morrison, should anyone be interested in the Morrisons of Dairsie and Prestongrange I have been collecting research information on these two related families and would be happy to share what material I have so far pieced together. One of the aspects of this line of research is the fact that the Morrisons of Prestongrange, Dairsie and Bognie all have the same coat of arms and motto dating from the mid 1600s. Their coat of arms and motto was subsequently adopted by the Clan Morrison Society in 1909.
Alex.
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Re: Morrison Folktales about the name, tartan and badge.

Postby georgeetta » Sun Aug 31, 2014 2:12 pm

when I was little ..I always saw the old green colors and the 3 headed badge ..but my granda was not ..into research ..

his family was 1840 about monklands and moved across to stirling in coal towns
Binniehill
Whiflet
Old Monklands ..
see Scottish miners ..site David was a foreman and 3-4 sons working Cowie ALLOA coal ..2-3 to Canada
till post 1920 ..mines closed Cowie ..so I have feeling we are ling up to be Buchanan Morrisons ..TALE was ..Buchanan's (a place styled name) have many chiefs or sons called Maurice and a tale of a Maurice who killed a Kenneth MacKenzie then ..sort of went off on their own ..and his grandson moved further ..hence Morrisons ..

the Moor's head may have been a ..Christina idea of Moor's being the enemy and heads strung together ..like the heads of Morrisons on MacLeod's sword .

Maurice was a ..............likely Norman name ..of the Wm Conqueror campaign ..

I know our family are really dark skinned folk ..thru Granda . like middle eastern !
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Re: Morrison Folktales about the name, tartan and badge.

Postby georgeetta » Sun Aug 31, 2014 2:24 pm

I read Morriosn of Bognie was just bought by a rich Morrison and set up shop there ..

it lasted maybe a few generations ..

post clan glen living of 1700's ..the upper class would have been settling and sons going off as opportunity and finances ..came up ..Clan Gordon were originally in SW area ..but I associate them with back of Aberdeenshire ..all the Duke of Gordon stories ..

bulk of common folk I think didn't; really leave some bigger towns ..until after WW2 ..

but ..my family drifted following coal towns post ..Industrial Revolution ..supporting iron steel industry production ..hayfork 1 minute ..pick the next .

My aunt says she minds Granda saying ..he crawled 1/2 mile ..to get to his ..place I saw pic of him at 14 ..out of mines ..

Cowie was created ..the owners had a pub but shoved out ..boozing and had fishing ..gardening ..bands ..to distract ..the ..evils of ..pit life ..

"the miners" used to come up to visit for years ..Jimmy Hutchins ..etc ..my aunt liked their Stirling accents ..

Granda's Grunny ..was Janet Douglas Morrison having married James Morrison what I gather about 1860 Monklands ..grgranda was born about 1871 ..Monklands general area ..then moved to ..Stirling and had the in laws in tow ..John Douglas aged 71 and grgrunny Janet also about 70 ..

I have pic of her about aged ..80ish ..she looks like ma ..and my cousins ..Granda ..used to say ..his ma having died ..the auld wife used to tell them scary stories of ..ghosts etc ..and Douglasses were related to the Black Douglas and if they were bad he'd come to their beds and steal them away ..Uncle in Canada said same thing thru his Dad .

nice to see anything Scottish but feels better to be among Morrisons.

th
d
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Re: Morrison Folktales about the name, tartan and badge.

Postby Gary Morrison » Tue Sep 16, 2014 8:46 pm

Interesting stories from georgeetta. Thanks. You mention that your family skin colour is "dark skinned...like Middle-Eastern". I was wondering whether you had your DNA tested. It would be interesting to see if you're L159+, which some Morrisons are.

Best regards,
Gary Morrison
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Re: Morrison Folktales about the name, tartan and badge.

Postby Felix_W_Morrison+01 » Mon Sep 04, 2017 12:01 pm

Alexander,
Yours in the most cogent, well researched, and logical treatise I have ever read about the Morrisons and their origin(s). Thank you. I've had a difficult time putting my family's lineage together with all of the stories and gaps in dates and traditions in the information I have used. I'm sure everyone shares this same dilemma; your research, and the meticulous methods you have used have been very helpful. Being a part of haplogroup M-201 I thought maybe I wasn't a Morrison at all, and should
probably have a name from ancient Serbia.
To quote your work : "Following these discoveries research shows the early settlers were followed by more persistent farming families carrying the M269 marker with its distinctive R1b which makes up about 70% of men carrying it in Scotland today. M269 is thought to have originated in Southeast Europe in the early Bronze Age. Other descendants of these farmers carry the M172, M201 and M35 markers and point to settlement in the south of Scotland where they still cluster today."
The above quote has put my mind at ease thanks to your research. You make a very strong case for the "Anglo-Scotch" roots of the Morrisons.
Very, very well done. Thanks again!
Felix (Fil) Morrison
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